Astronomical Happy Hour: The Blue Moon Cocktail

You might have heard that tonight is a rare “blue moon” – that is, the second full moon in a calendar month. They’re not super-rare, but uncommon enough to have our next one not occur until all the way in May, 2016.

And since today is Friday, what better way than to celebrate with the Blue Moon Cocktail, which is a variation of the pre-Prohibition classic Aviation.

Blue Moon Cocktail

  • 2 oz gin
  • 0.5 oz crème de violette
  • 0.5 oz lemon juice

Combine ingredients in a shaker with ice. Shake vigorously and strain into a coupe’ or cocktail glass. Garnish with a lemon peel.

Blue Moon Cocktail

This is a great, crisp drink on a warm summer evening. The crème de violette imparts a little sweetness and provides an appealing dusky hue. Just don’t have too many, you might not make it to moonrise.

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22 thoughts on “Astronomical Happy Hour: The Blue Moon Cocktail

  1. Oh wow. Beautiful. I did a post (sort of a repost) on violet chemistry and how it’s used in color. Does the liqueur taste like violet? We visited an awesome new tapas restaurant by the coast called Moxy, the bartender made a very old style daiquiri with just rum, fresh lime and simple syrup, no sour mix. Tasted awesome. But it was green, not your sublime blue. Love it.

    Here’s to blue moons!

    • Amelie — the liqueur has a distinct floral taste — sweet, without being too cloying — though a little goes a long way, it’s like a concentrated solution… :)

      Nothing should ever ever ever be made with sour mix — and a true daiquiri is just what you described. It’s a very simple and wonderful cocktail — and it’s amazing to see how far some version get from that!!

    • BD — I may or may not have an obsession with glassware. I think that your cocktail is part of your dinner deserves to be presented nicely, and that every drink needs the right glass.

      Those coupe glasses were actually a gift from a fellow blogger who was cleaning out an old family member’s home. They’re probably from the 1920s.

  2. I’ve never gotten into gin — I’ll drink it, don’t mind me, but it’s never my “choice” base booze. Any ideas why? I have a guess that it’s because it’s got a sort of sweetness to it and unless I’m drinking cidre (even then I want “brut”), I don’t care for sweet. I’d think as a Reed, I’d like any hard liquor.

  3. Pingback: Blue Moon « simplycessie

  4. I had a Vesper Lind… or rather, two of them… Friday night. With the proper liquor that you can’t hardly get any more. It was FABULOUS. I also had an original proper Cosmopolitan, not the bright pink girly type you get nowadays.

    Also, these were mixed and poured for me by an award-winning robot bartender. I am not making that up. It’s called “The ThinBot” in honor of William Powell.

    I am now spoiled for all other drinks. Which didn’t stop me from swilling further booze Saturday night, but it was much less elegant.

    • I WANT A ROBOT TO MAKE ME A DRINK!!! But not too often, I actually like making my own drinks most of the time… :)

      One of the things I’ve found remarkable is how many drinks made crappy by super-sweetening them up, or bastardizing them (daiquiris, margaritas, cosmopolitan, etc) are actually GREAT drinks when you go back to the originals.

      • The tubes and the multi-colored blinky lights and the DING! of the bell when your drink’s done add something, that’s for sure.

        The only sweetener in ThinBot’s menu is simple syrup, and not much of that. The rest is good-quality ingredients, kept cold. The Cosmo was a delight, and the Vesper Lind… I mean, it’s been a week and I’m still marveling over it.

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